Cyclone Pam

[https://qzprod.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/rtr4t7co.png?w=640]

[https://qzprod.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/rtr4t7co.png?w=640]

MSAT imagery from NOAA depicting Cyclone Pam over the islands of Vanuatu (outlined in pink) on Mar. 13.(NOAA)

MSAT imagery from NOAA depicting Cyclone Pam over the islands of Vanuatu (outlined in pink) on Mar. 13.(NOAA)

Category 5 cyclone Pam ravaged tiny islands nation Vanuatu in the SW Pacific Ocean in mid-March 2015. The power of the storm itself was stronger than the hurricane Katrina that had landed on New Orleans, LA in 2005, without any seawalls or levies. These Pacific islands have already been struggling to cope with the sea level rise and its dire consequences in the past decade. I feel sorry for the Vanuatu people. When I used to live in Port Aransas, TX which was on a tidy barrier island in the Gulf Coast, I would make a mental note to myself during each hurricane season. There was no natural structure on the island which was higher than few meters, and storm surge alone by a powerful major hurricane would likely rise above the sand dunes, if not puncture through the dunes. I had to refresh my understanding of the naming convention of the tropical cyclones in various parts of the words’ oceans this time. The Pacific Ocean can have all three names of the tropical storms depending on the areas: hurricanes if they occur in the NE tropical Pacific Ocean, typhoon if in the NW Pacific Ocean, and cyclone if in the South Pacific Ocean. The Pacific Ocean is indeed BIG.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Advertisements
%d bloggers like this: